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Difference between revisions of "Neutron/DVR L2 Agent"

 
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==Authors==
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 +
<b>Vivekanandan Narasimhan</b>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Hewlett Packard Inc<br>
 +
<b>Swaminathan Vasudevan</b>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Hewlett Packard Inc<br>
 +
 
== Purpose ==
 
== Purpose ==
 +
  
 
NOTE: This Blueprint is part of the Distributed Virtual Router. The parent blueprint for the DVR can be accessed from the link below.
 
NOTE: This Blueprint is part of the Distributed Virtual Router. The parent blueprint for the DVR can be accessed from the link below.
 +
  
 
[https://blueprints.launchpad.net/neutron/+spec/neutron-ovs-dvr Distributed Virtual Router Blueprint]
 
[https://blueprints.launchpad.net/neutron/+spec/neutron-ovs-dvr Distributed Virtual Router Blueprint]
 +
  
 
This document describes the changes that are proposed in the L2 Plugin and the L2 Agent for OpenStack Neutron in order to enable distributed virtual router functionality at the L2 layer.
 
This document describes the changes that are proposed in the L2 Plugin and the L2 Agent for OpenStack Neutron in order to enable distributed virtual router functionality at the L2 layer.
 +
  
 
== Design Goals for L2 in DVR ==
 
== Design Goals for L2 in DVR ==
  
 
There are set of goals that went into the design of the set of rules in OVS to enable distributed virtual routing functionality at the L2 layer.  They are the following:
 
There are set of goals that went into the design of the set of rules in OVS to enable distributed virtual routing functionality at the L2 layer.  They are the following:
 +
 
1.      The rules should enable communication between tenant VMs on different networks, via a distributed router hosted in the compute node.
 
1.      The rules should enable communication between tenant VMs on different networks, via a distributed router hosted in the compute node.
 +
 
2.      Any given distributed router instance may reside on an all the Compute Nodes and will be responsible for routing packets generated by VMs co-residing on the same node.  
 
2.      Any given distributed router instance may reside on an all the Compute Nodes and will be responsible for routing packets generated by VMs co-residing on the same node.  
 +
 
3.      A given distributed router instance is either hosted in the Compute Node as DVR (or) as normal router on the Network Node, but never simultaneously in both the nodes.
 
3.      A given distributed router instance is either hosted in the Compute Node as DVR (or) as normal router on the Network Node, but never simultaneously in both the nodes.
 +
 
4.      The rules should be such that the existing OpenVswitch infrastructure in OpenStack Neutron can be used to accomplish distributed routing.
 
4.      The rules should be such that the existing OpenVswitch infrastructure in OpenStack Neutron can be used to accomplish distributed routing.
 +
 
5.      Should use lesser MAC Address per compute node and continue to preserve L2 isolation for routed packets by distributed routers.
 
5.      Should use lesser MAC Address per compute node and continue to preserve L2 isolation for routed packets by distributed routers.
 +
 
6.      Should ensure enablement of North-South routing, which indicates access to external network by the VMs directly.
 
6.      Should ensure enablement of North-South routing, which indicates access to external network by the VMs directly.
 +
 
7.      Should embrace FWaaS Service to be operational even with distributed routing enabled on DVR interfaces.
 
7.      Should embrace FWaaS Service to be operational even with distributed routing enabled on DVR interfaces.
 +
 
8.      MAC timeouts and ARP timeouts of any element (bridges) inside the nodes in the cloud, should not affect operation of DVR
 
8.      MAC timeouts and ARP timeouts of any element (bridges) inside the nodes in the cloud, should not affect operation of DVR
 +
 
9.      The rules must ensure that multi-tenant isolation is intact even when Overlapping IP Addresses is enabled in the cloud.
 
9.      The rules must ensure that multi-tenant isolation is intact even when Overlapping IP Addresses is enabled in the cloud.
 +
 
10.  The rules must ensure that multi-tenant isolation is intact even when Overlapping MAC Addresses are enabled in the cloud (By overlapping MAC Addresses, what is meant here is that MAC Addresses across different networks could be the same)
 
10.  The rules must ensure that multi-tenant isolation is intact even when Overlapping MAC Addresses are enabled in the cloud (By overlapping MAC Addresses, what is meant here is that MAC Addresses across different networks could be the same)
  
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'''''red1-L-vlan''''' Represents the local vlan of the red network on Compute node CN1
 
'''''red1-L-vlan''''' Represents the local vlan of the red network on Compute node CN1
 +
  
 
'''''grn1-L-vlan''''' Represents the local vlan of the green network on Compute node CN1
 
'''''grn1-L-vlan''''' Represents the local vlan of the green network on Compute node CN1
 +
  
 
'''''red2-L-vlan''''' Represents the local vlan of the red network on Compute node CN2
 
'''''red2-L-vlan''''' Represents the local vlan of the red network on Compute node CN2
 +
  
 
'''''grn2-L-vlan''''' Represents the local vlan of the green network on Compute node CN2
 
'''''grn2-L-vlan''''' Represents the local vlan of the green network on Compute node CN2
 +
  
 
'''''red-vni''''' Represents the VXLAN ID used in the tunneled frame, for the tenant network represented by
 
'''''red-vni''''' Represents the VXLAN ID used in the tunneled frame, for the tenant network represented by
 
red-L-vlan local vlan.
 
red-L-vlan local vlan.
 +
  
 
'''''grn-vni''''' Represents the VXLAN ID used in the tunneled frame, for the tenant network represented by grn-L-vlan local vlan.
 
'''''grn-vni''''' Represents the VXLAN ID used in the tunneled frame, for the tenant network represented by grn-L-vlan local vlan.
 +
  
 
'''''r1-red-ip''''' Represents the IP Address of the red subnet interface of the DVR Router (r1).  This IP Address for red subnet interface would remain the same on DVR Router (r1) instantiated in both CN1 and CN2.
 
'''''r1-red-ip''''' Represents the IP Address of the red subnet interface of the DVR Router (r1).  This IP Address for red subnet interface would remain the same on DVR Router (r1) instantiated in both CN1 and CN2.
 +
  
 
'''''r1-grn-ip''''' Represents the IP Address of the green subnet interface of the DVR Router (r1).  This IP Address for green subnet interface would remain the same on DVR Router (r1) instantiated in both CN1 and CN2.
 
'''''r1-grn-ip''''' Represents the IP Address of the green subnet interface of the DVR Router (r1).  This IP Address for green subnet interface would remain the same on DVR Router (r1) instantiated in both CN1 and CN2.
 +
  
 
'''''r1-red-mac''''' Represents the MAC Address of the red subnet interface of the DVR Router (r1).  This MAC Address for the red subnet interface would remain the same on DVR Router (r1) instantiated in both CN1 and CN2.
 
'''''r1-red-mac''''' Represents the MAC Address of the red subnet interface of the DVR Router (r1).  This MAC Address for the red subnet interface would remain the same on DVR Router (r1) instantiated in both CN1 and CN2.
 +
  
 
'''''r1-grn-mac'''''  Represents the MAC Address of the green subnet interface of the DVR Router (r1).  This MAC Address for the green subnet interface would remain the same on DVR Router (r1) instantiated in both CN1 and CN2.
 
'''''r1-grn-mac'''''  Represents the MAC Address of the green subnet interface of the DVR Router (r1).  This MAC Address for the green subnet interface would remain the same on DVR Router (r1) instantiated in both CN1 and CN2.
 +
  
 
'''''dvr-cn1-mac''''' Represents Mac Address allocated from DVR Base Mac pool by the controller to Compute Node CN1.  This mac address will go as the source mac address in all the frames that are generated by the DVR subnet interfaces present in CN1.
 
'''''dvr-cn1-mac''''' Represents Mac Address allocated from DVR Base Mac pool by the controller to Compute Node CN1.  This mac address will go as the source mac address in all the frames that are generated by the DVR subnet interfaces present in CN1.
 +
  
 
'''''dvr-cn2-mac''''' Represents Mac Address allocated from DVR Base Mac pool by the controller to Compute Node CN2.  This mac address will go as the source mac address in all the frames that are generated by the DVR subnet interfaces present in CN2.
 
'''''dvr-cn2-mac''''' Represents Mac Address allocated from DVR Base Mac pool by the controller to Compute Node CN2.  This mac address will go as the source mac address in all the frames that are generated by the DVR subnet interfaces present in CN2.
 +
  
 
In the above figure, a PING ECHO Request is initiated from vm1 on red network to vm2 on green network which are connected by a DVR router identified by r1.  The DVR Router r1 will have the same IP Address and MAC Address on both the nodes CN1 and CN2.  As we see, the DVR Router  r1 has two interfaces: one interface is a subnet in the red network and another interface is a subnet in the green network.
 
In the above figure, a PING ECHO Request is initiated from vm1 on red network to vm2 on green network which are connected by a DVR router identified by r1.  The DVR Router r1 will have the same IP Address and MAC Address on both the nodes CN1 and CN2.  As we see, the DVR Router  r1 has two interfaces: one interface is a subnet in the red network and another interface is a subnet in the green network.
 +
  
 
The packet flow for PING ECHO Request from vm1 to vm2 is shown in the above figure with packets numbered from ‘1’ to ‘6’.
 
The packet flow for PING ECHO Request from vm1 to vm2 is shown in the above figure with packets numbered from ‘1’ to ‘6’.
 +
  
 
1  The frame with destination ip as ‘vm2 ip’ is sent by vm1 towards its default gateway mac for red network which is r1-red-mac. The integration bridge forwards this frame to DVR router r1.
 
1  The frame with destination ip as ‘vm2 ip’ is sent by vm1 towards its default gateway mac for red network which is r1-red-mac. The integration bridge forwards this frame to DVR router r1.
 +
  
 
2 The DVR router r1’s red subnet interface picks this frame and it then routes the IP packet in the frame.  
 
2 The DVR router r1’s red subnet interface picks this frame and it then routes the IP packet in the frame.  
 +
  
 
3 After routing, the DVR router r1 puts the routed frame out of its green subnet interface.  This frame is switched by the integration bridge towards the tunnel bridge along with tagging the frame with green network’s local-vlan tag.
 
3 After routing, the DVR router r1 puts the routed frame out of its green subnet interface.  This frame is switched by the integration bridge towards the tunnel bridge along with tagging the frame with green network’s local-vlan tag.
 +
  
 
4 The tunnel bridge on CN1, replaces the frame’s source mac address with a Unique DVR MAC Address of its node (one unique dvr mac address is assigned per compute node by the controller).  The resulting frame is forwarded to CN2 by this tunnel bridge.  Before forwarding, it also strips the local green-vlan tag and tunnels the frame with green-vni VXLAN id.
 
4 The tunnel bridge on CN1, replaces the frame’s source mac address with a Unique DVR MAC Address of its node (one unique dvr mac address is assigned per compute node by the controller).  The resulting frame is forwarded to CN2 by this tunnel bridge.  Before forwarding, it also strips the local green-vlan tag and tunnels the frame with green-vni VXLAN id.
 +
  
 
5      The tunnel bridge on CN2, picks up the tunneled frame, de-tunnels it and strips off the green-vni tag.  It then adds its local green network vlan tag to the frame and forwards the frame to the integration bridge.
 
5      The tunnel bridge on CN2, picks up the tunneled frame, de-tunnels it and strips off the green-vni tag.  It then adds its local green network vlan tag to the frame and forwards the frame to the integration bridge.
 +
  
 
6 The integration bridge on CN2, identifies the incoming frame’s source mac address is a DVR Unique MAC Address (every compute node l2-agent knows all dvr unique mac addresses used in the cloud).  It then replaces the DVR Unique MAC Address with the green subnet interface MAC address and forwards the frame to vm2.
 
6 The integration bridge on CN2, identifies the incoming frame’s source mac address is a DVR Unique MAC Address (every compute node l2-agent knows all dvr unique mac addresses used in the cloud).  It then replaces the DVR Unique MAC Address with the green subnet interface MAC address and forwards the frame to vm2.
 +
  
 
For the PING RESPONSE from vm2 to vm1, the same above sequence happens in reverse.
 
For the PING RESPONSE from vm2 to vm1, the same above sequence happens in reverse.
 +
  
 
As you might notice, the frames are routed by the DVR router in the frame originating node itself and then they are just put towards the right destination.  For all the routed frames, the DVR Unique MAC Address of the frame’s originating node is used in the underlay, as the Source MAC Address of the frame (ie., in inner frame).
 
As you might notice, the frames are routed by the DVR router in the frame originating node itself and then they are just put towards the right destination.  For all the routed frames, the DVR Unique MAC Address of the frame’s originating node is used in the underlay, as the Source MAC Address of the frame (ie., in inner frame).
 +
  
 
The ARP entry for vm2 will be pre-populated in DVR router r1 residing in CN1, by the L3-Agent running on CN1 (through information supplied from the L3 Plugin).  Similarly the ARP entry for vm1 will be pre-populated in the DVR router r1 residing in CN2, again by the L3-Agent running on CN2 (through information supplied from the L3 Plugin).
 
The ARP entry for vm2 will be pre-populated in DVR router r1 residing in CN1, by the L3-Agent running on CN1 (through information supplied from the L3 Plugin).  Similarly the ARP entry for vm1 will be pre-populated in the DVR router r1 residing in CN2, again by the L3-Agent running on CN2 (through information supplied from the L3 Plugin).
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All those tables and rules shown in brown are the new ones that will be additionally managed by the L2 Agent, while it runs in DVR Mode.  
 
All those tables and rules shown in brown are the new ones that will be additionally managed by the L2 Agent, while it runs in DVR Mode.  
 +
  
 
A brief description of the rules are given below:
 
A brief description of the rules are given below:
 +
  
 
a.      ARP broadcast requests generated by tenant VMs are broadcasted to every other CN in the cloud.  However, if the ARP request frame’s target is the default gateway IP (router subnet ip), then such frames are dropped by the local tunnel bridge from being forwarded to the cloud.  Because, such ARPs need and will be serviced only by locally available DVR instances.
 
a.      ARP broadcast requests generated by tenant VMs are broadcasted to every other CN in the cloud.  However, if the ARP request frame’s target is the default gateway IP (router subnet ip), then such frames are dropped by the local tunnel bridge from being forwarded to the cloud.  Because, such ARPs need and will be serviced only by locally available DVR instances.
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==== Tunnel bridge ====
 
==== Tunnel bridge ====
 +
  
 
DVR PROCESS Table 1 (New table for dvr):
 
DVR PROCESS Table 1 (New table for dvr):
 
table=1, priority=4,  dl_vlan= red1-L-vlan,  dl_type=arp, ar_tpa= r1-red-ip actions: drop
 
table=1, priority=4,  dl_vlan= red1-L-vlan,  dl_type=arp, ar_tpa= r1-red-ip actions: drop
 
table=1, priority=4, dl_vlan= grn1-L-vlan,  dl_type=arp, ar_tpa= r1-grn-ip actions: drop
 
table=1, priority=4, dl_vlan= grn1-L-vlan,  dl_type=arp, ar_tpa= r1-grn-ip actions: drop
 +
 +
 
   
 
   
 
b.      All requests generated by the distributed router interface ports, be it ARP request, other broadcast (or) unicast packets, will be sent to the cloud.  But, all such frames are considered “dvr routed frames” and hence such frames will carry “local unique dvr macaddress“ in the source mac of the frame before being forwarded to the cloud, on the originating node itself.  
 
b.      All requests generated by the distributed router interface ports, be it ARP request, other broadcast (or) unicast packets, will be sent to the cloud.  But, all such frames are considered “dvr routed frames” and hence such frames will carry “local unique dvr macaddress“ in the source mac of the frame before being forwarded to the cloud, on the originating node itself.  
 +
 +
  
 
This translation of local router interface mac-address to “local unique dvr macaddress” is done by the following rules in the DVR PROCESS table.
 
This translation of local router interface mac-address to “local unique dvr macaddress” is done by the following rules in the DVR PROCESS table.
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==== Tunnel bridge ====
 
==== Tunnel bridge ====
 +
  
 
DVR PROCESS Table 1 (New table for dvr):
 
DVR PROCESS Table 1 (New table for dvr):
 
table=1, priority=1, dl_vlan=red2_L_vlan, dl_src=r1-red-mac, actions: mod_dl_src=dvr-cn1-mac, resubmit(,2)
 
table=1, priority=1, dl_vlan=red2_L_vlan, dl_src=r1-red-mac, actions: mod_dl_src=dvr-cn1-mac, resubmit(,2)
 
table=1, priority=1, dl_vlan=grn2_L_vlan, dl_src=r1-grn-mac, actions: mod_dl_src=dvr-cn1-mac, resubmit (,2)
 
table=1, priority=1, dl_vlan=grn2_L_vlan, dl_src=r1-grn-mac, actions: mod_dl_src=dvr-cn1-mac, resubmit (,2)
 +
 +
 
   
 
   
 
c.      Complementing to what was captured as point b above, in DVR routed frames received by a compute node,  the integration bridge on destination node will rip off the unique DVR MAC Addresses from the source MAC field of the frame. In place of the same, the integration bridge will substitute the local dvr instance subnet interface mac address , before the frame is forwarded to the local destination VM.  This is done by new Table 1 on integration bridge. For example on CN2:
 
c.      Complementing to what was captured as point b above, in DVR routed frames received by a compute node,  the integration bridge on destination node will rip off the unique DVR MAC Addresses from the source MAC field of the frame. In place of the same, the integration bridge will substitute the local dvr instance subnet interface mac address , before the frame is forwarded to the local destination VM.  This is done by new Table 1 on integration bridge. For example on CN2:
 +
  
  
 
==== Integration Bridge Rules ====
 
==== Integration Bridge Rules ====
 +
  
 
Table 0: (Local switching table)
 
Table 0: (Local switching table)
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table=0, priority=1, actions: output->NORMAL
 
table=0, priority=1, actions: output->NORMAL
 
Table 1: (DVR_TO_LOCALMAC table)
 
Table 1: (DVR_TO_LOCALMAC table)
 +
  
 
table=1, priority=2, dl_vlan=grn2-L-vlan, nw_dst=grn-subnet actions:  strip_vlan, mod_dl_src=r1-grn-MAC,output->port-vm2
 
table=1, priority=2, dl_vlan=grn2-L-vlan, nw_dst=grn-subnet actions:  strip_vlan, mod_dl_src=r1-grn-MAC,output->port-vm2
 
table=1, priority=1 actions: drop
 
table=1, priority=1 actions: drop
 +
 
   
 
   
 
d.      Packets destined to the local dvr subnet interface mac address are dropped by the tunnel bridge in the originating compute node, as forwarding them to the cloud, will create mac ambiguity when the packet is decoded by other compute nodes in the cloud.  This is accomplished by the
 
d.      Packets destined to the local dvr subnet interface mac address are dropped by the tunnel bridge in the originating compute node, as forwarding them to the cloud, will create mac ambiguity when the packet is decoded by other compute nodes in the cloud.  This is accomplished by the
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==== Tunnel bridge ====
 
==== Tunnel bridge ====
 +
  
 
DVR PROCESS Table 1 (New table for dvr):
 
DVR PROCESS Table 1 (New table for dvr):
 
table=1, priority=2, dl_vlan=red2_L_vlan, dl_dst=r1-red-mac, actions: drop
 
table=1, priority=2, dl_vlan=red2_L_vlan, dl_dst=r1-red-mac, actions: drop
 
table=1, priority=2 , dl_vlan=grn2_L_vlan, dl_dst=r1-grn-mac, actions: drop
 
table=1, priority=2 , dl_vlan=grn2_L_vlan, dl_dst=r1-grn-mac, actions: drop
 +
 
   
 
   
 
e.      In order to prevent multiple unicast of routed packets destined to remote VMs to all compute nodes in the cloud, the l2 pre-population technique is used to pre-populate the FDB table in the compute node to put out the frame only to the correct single destination compute node.
 
e.      In order to prevent multiple unicast of routed packets destined to remote VMs to all compute nodes in the cloud, the l2 pre-population technique is used to pre-populate the FDB table in the compute node to put out the frame only to the correct single destination compute node.
 +
 +
 
   
 
   
 
f.      For rules like these in the integration bridge, where a long list of ports might appear in the ‘output port’ action, this document proposes the use of ‘Group Tables’ facility available from OpenVswitch(OVS)  version 2.1.
 
f.      For rules like these in the integration bridge, where a long list of ports might appear in the ‘output port’ action, this document proposes the use of ‘Group Tables’ facility available from OpenVswitch(OVS)  version 2.1.
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==== Integration bridge ====
 
==== Integration bridge ====
 +
  
 
Table 1: (DVR_TO_LOCALMAC table)
 
Table 1: (DVR_TO_LOCALMAC table)
 
table=1, priority=2, dl_vlan=grn2-L-vlan, nw_dst=grn-subnet actions:  strip_vlan, mod_dl_src=r1-grn-MAC,output->port-vm2
 
table=1, priority=2, dl_vlan=grn2-L-vlan, nw_dst=grn-subnet actions:  strip_vlan, mod_dl_src=r1-grn-MAC,output->port-vm2
 +
 
   
 
   
 
== DataModel Extension for L2 in DVR ==
 
== DataModel Extension for L2 in DVR ==
 +
  
 
[[File:Datamodel.png|center|Datamodel extension for L2 agent to handle Internal local MAC]]
 
[[File:Datamodel.png|center|Datamodel extension for L2 agent to handle Internal local MAC]]
 +
  
 
The DistributedVirtualRouterMacAddress table is maintained in the controller and this table is used to store/retrieve unique DVR MAC Addresses supplied to L2 agent running on hosts identified by ‘host’.
 
The DistributedVirtualRouterMacAddress table is maintained in the controller and this table is used to store/retrieve unique DVR MAC Addresses supplied to L2 agent running on hosts identified by ‘host’.
 +
  
 
== Configuration specific to L2 Agent ==
 
== Configuration specific to L2 Agent ==
 +
  
 
==== enable_distributed_routing ====
 
==== enable_distributed_routing ====
 +
  
 
The ovs_neutron_plugin.ini file being used by the OVS L2 Agent, will have an additional configuration flag:
 
The ovs_neutron_plugin.ini file being used by the OVS L2 Agent, will have an additional configuration flag:
 +
  
 
<pre>enable_distributed_routing=False</pre>
 
<pre>enable_distributed_routing=False</pre>
 +
  
 
In order to run the OVS L2 Agent in DVR Mode, the above flag must be set to True and the OVS L2 Agent must be restarted. The default value of this flag is False.  For example on the Network Node, the L2 Agent will not run in DVR Mode.  That is in NN, this flag will need to be left as is by the cloud administrator.
 
In order to run the OVS L2 Agent in DVR Mode, the above flag must be set to True and the OVS L2 Agent must be restarted. The default value of this flag is False.  For example on the Network Node, the L2 Agent will not run in DVR Mode.  That is in NN, this flag will need to be left as is by the cloud administrator.
 +
  
 
The L2 Agent will operate normally as it is today. However, when the enable_distributed_routing=True is read by the L2 Agent in its init(), it will additionally run in DVR Mode.  What is DVR Mode?  DVR Mode just refers to the enhanced behavior of the L2 Agent, wherein it will intelligently handle Distributed Router Interface ports that are detected on the integration bridge.  As part of processing distributed router interface port (presence/absence), it will be using the OVS Rules documented in this document.
 
The L2 Agent will operate normally as it is today. However, when the enable_distributed_routing=True is read by the L2 Agent in its init(), it will additionally run in DVR Mode.  What is DVR Mode?  DVR Mode just refers to the enhanced behavior of the L2 Agent, wherein it will intelligently handle Distributed Router Interface ports that are detected on the integration bridge.  As part of processing distributed router interface port (presence/absence), it will be using the OVS Rules documented in this document.
 +
  
 
==== dvr_base_mac ====
 
==== dvr_base_mac ====
 +
  
 
There is another flag that will need to be made available in neutron.conf which represents the base-mac to use for DVR Unique MAC allocation by the ML2 Plugin.  That configuration is given here:
 
There is another flag that will need to be made available in neutron.conf which represents the base-mac to use for DVR Unique MAC allocation by the ML2 Plugin.  That configuration is given here:
 +
  
 
# DVR Base MAC address. The first 3 octets will remain unchanged. If the
 
# DVR Base MAC address. The first 3 octets will remain unchanged. If the
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# 4 octet
 
# 4 octet
 
# dvr_base_mac = fa:16:3f:4f:00:00
 
# dvr_base_mac = fa:16:3f:4f:00:00
 +
  
 
The above dvr_base_mac MUST be different from the base-mac used allocated for virtual ports.  This is required in order to ensure isolation of virtual port Mac Addresses from the DVR Unique Mac Addresses themselves.
 
The above dvr_base_mac MUST be different from the base-mac used allocated for virtual ports.  This is required in order to ensure isolation of virtual port Mac Addresses from the DVR Unique Mac Addresses themselves.
 +
  
 
== RPC Changes ==
 
== RPC Changes ==
 +
  
 
This section describes the new RPC calls that will be introduced in the L2 area of OpenStack to enable DVR functionality.
 
This section describes the new RPC calls that will be introduced in the L2 area of OpenStack to enable DVR functionality.
 +
  
 
The following new RPCs will be introduced:
 
The following new RPCs will be introduced:
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[[File:get_dvr_mac_address_by_host.png|center|Function that returns the DVR MAC address by host]]
+
[[File:Get_dvr_mac_address_by_host.png|center|Function that returns the DVR MAC address by host]]
  
  
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[[File:get_dvr_mac_address.png|center|Get DVR MAC address]]
+
[[File:Get_dvr_mac_address.png|center|Get DVR MAC address]]
  
  
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[[File:dvr_mac_address_update.png|center|DVR MAC Address update]]
+
[[File:Dvr_mac_address_update.png|center|DVR MAC Address update]]
  
  
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[[File:get_compute_ports_on_host_by_subnet.png|center|Get compute vm ports on host by subnet]]
+
[[File:Get_compute_ports_on_host_by_subnet.png|center|Get compute vm ports on host by subnet]]
  
  
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[[File:get_compute_ports_by_subnet.png|center|Get compute ports by subnet]]
+
[[File:Get_compute_ports_by_subnet.png|center|Get compute ports by subnet]]
  
  
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[[File:get_device_details.png|center|Get device details]]
+
[[File:Get_device_details.png|center|Get device details]]
 +
 
  
  
 
== L2 Interaction with Plugin and L3 Agent ==
 
== L2 Interaction with Plugin and L3 Agent ==
 +
 +
  
 
==== L2 OVS Agent initialization ====
 
==== L2 OVS Agent initialization ====
 +
 +
  
 
During initialization the L2 OVS Agent needs to know its hosted unique dvr mac address, in order to key in the appropriate OVS rules into the tunnel and integration bridges.  For this purpose, the L2 agent invokes RPC get_dvr_mac_address(host_id) served by ML2 plugin.
 
During initialization the L2 OVS Agent needs to know its hosted unique dvr mac address, in order to key in the appropriate OVS rules into the tunnel and integration bridges.  For this purpose, the L2 agent invokes RPC get_dvr_mac_address(host_id) served by ML2 plugin.
 +
 +
  
 
[[File:L2-ovs-agent-init-flow-with-dvr-config.png|1024x768px|center|L2 OVS agent initialization]]
 
[[File:L2-ovs-agent-init-flow-with-dvr-config.png|1024x768px|center|L2 OVS agent initialization]]
 +
 +
  
 
==== Distributed Router creation ====
 
==== Distributed Router creation ====
 +
  
 
A router can be created to explicitly as a distributed router.  There is typically no action required on the agents due to creation of router (be in distributed mode or otherwise).  Only when an interface is added to the router, there are actions taken in both the L2 and L3 agents.
 
A router can be created to explicitly as a distributed router.  There is typically no action required on the agents due to creation of router (be in distributed mode or otherwise).  Only when an interface is added to the router, there are actions taken in both the L2 and L3 agents.
Line 267: Line 353:
 
A router-interface-add command executed on a distributed router results in routers_updated() RPC to be invoked on the L3-Agent-on-CN.  As part of servicing such a request, the L3-Agent-on-CN initially validates if the router affected is a distributed router.  If so, it then gets the interface port corresponding to that newly added interface and attaches that port on the integration bridge.  This part of operation is similar in nature to that of the L3 Agent except for the difference being that the L3-Agent-on-CN runs in the Compute Node and adds router ports only if such ports are destined on a distributed router.  
 
A router-interface-add command executed on a distributed router results in routers_updated() RPC to be invoked on the L3-Agent-on-CN.  As part of servicing such a request, the L3-Agent-on-CN initially validates if the router affected is a distributed router.  If so, it then gets the interface port corresponding to that newly added interface and attaches that port on the integration bridge.  This part of operation is similar in nature to that of the L3 Agent except for the difference being that the L3-Agent-on-CN runs in the Compute Node and adds router ports only if such ports are destined on a distributed router.  
  
Ports that are interfaces of a distributed router will have a special device_owner field value as ‘network:router_interface_distributed’.
+
 
 +
Ports that are interfaces of a distributed router will have a special device_owner field value as '''''network:router_interface_distributed'''''.
 +
 
  
 
After adding the router interface port on the br-int, the L3-Agent-on-CN requests information about the list of ports on the cloud available on this subnet interface.  For this it invokes get_compute_ports_ by_subnet (subnet_id) towards the L3 Plugin.  The L3 Plugin then contacts the ML2 Plugin to get all the ports available on the input subnet and returns the list of ports to the L3-Agent-on-CN.  The L3-Agent-on-CN caches these ports and then uses the port information to create static ARP entries in the DVR router namespace.  This completes the DVR-side handling of the router-interface.
 
After adding the router interface port on the br-int, the L3-Agent-on-CN requests information about the list of ports on the cloud available on this subnet interface.  For this it invokes get_compute_ports_ by_subnet (subnet_id) towards the L3 Plugin.  The L3 Plugin then contacts the ML2 Plugin to get all the ports available on the input subnet and returns the list of ports to the L3-Agent-on-CN.  The L3-Agent-on-CN caches these ports and then uses the port information to create static ARP entries in the DVR router namespace.  This completes the DVR-side handling of the router-interface.
 +
  
 
The router interface port added by the L3-Agent-on-CN is detected by the L2 Agent.  The L2 Agent identifies if this port is a distributed router interface.  If not, it does normal processing.  If yes, it does special processing wherein it invokes get_compute_ports_on_host_by_subnet(subnet_id) to get the list of local VMs available on this router interface.  It then uses this list of ports and the router interface port information to create OVS rules in the tunnel and the integration bridges.
 
The router interface port added by the L3-Agent-on-CN is detected by the L2 Agent.  The L2 Agent identifies if this port is a distributed router interface.  If not, it does normal processing.  If yes, it does special processing wherein it invokes get_compute_ports_on_host_by_subnet(subnet_id) to get the list of local VMs available on this router interface.  It then uses this list of ports and the router interface port information to create OVS rules in the tunnel and the integration bridges.
Line 278: Line 367:
  
 
==== Interface removal from a distributed router ====
 
==== Interface removal from a distributed router ====
 +
  
 
A router-interface-delete command executed on a distributed router results in routers_updated() RPC to be invoked on the L3-Agent-on-CN.  As part of servicing such a request, the L3-Agent-on-CN initially validates if the router affected is a distributed router.  If so, it then gets the interface port corresponding to that being deleted. It removes that router interface port on the integration bridge.  This part of operation is similar in nature to that of the L3 Agent except for the difference being that the L3-Agent-on-CN runs in the Compute Node and deletes router ports only if such ports belong to a distributed router.
 
A router-interface-delete command executed on a distributed router results in routers_updated() RPC to be invoked on the L3-Agent-on-CN.  As part of servicing such a request, the L3-Agent-on-CN initially validates if the router affected is a distributed router.  If so, it then gets the interface port corresponding to that being deleted. It removes that router interface port on the integration bridge.  This part of operation is similar in nature to that of the L3 Agent except for the difference being that the L3-Agent-on-CN runs in the Compute Node and deletes router ports only if such ports belong to a distributed router.
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The router interface port deleted by the L3-Agent-on-CN is detected by the L2 Agent.  The L2 Agent identifies if this port is a distributed router interface.  If not, it does normal processing.  If yes, it does special processing wherein it removes all the OVS rules from the integration and the tunnel bridges, matching the removed router interface port.  
 
The router interface port deleted by the L3-Agent-on-CN is detected by the L2 Agent.  The L2 Agent identifies if this port is a distributed router interface.  If not, it does normal processing.  If yes, it does special processing wherein it removes all the OVS rules from the integration and the tunnel bridges, matching the removed router interface port.  
 +
  
 
==== New VM added to a subnet interface of a distributed router ====
 
==== New VM added to a subnet interface of a distributed router ====
 +
  
 
When a new tenant VM is added to a subnet interface managed by the distributed router, a CreatePort API invocation is done by Nova to host the new tenant VM.  As part of createPort servicing by the ML2 Plugin, the ML2 plugin will inform the L3 Plugin about a new port being available.  The L3 Plugin will check if this new port is in a DVR hosted subnet. If not it will not do any processing.  If yes, the L3 Plugin will initiate an RPC call port_add() to the L3-Agent-on-CN.  The L3-Agent-on-CN will service this RPC in which it will get this port information and add static ARP entry for that port in the corresponding router namespace.  This completes the DVR-side handling of the new tenant VM port addition.
 
When a new tenant VM is added to a subnet interface managed by the distributed router, a CreatePort API invocation is done by Nova to host the new tenant VM.  As part of createPort servicing by the ML2 Plugin, the ML2 plugin will inform the L3 Plugin about a new port being available.  The L3 Plugin will check if this new port is in a DVR hosted subnet. If not it will not do any processing.  If yes, the L3 Plugin will initiate an RPC call port_add() to the L3-Agent-on-CN.  The L3-Agent-on-CN will service this RPC in which it will get this port information and add static ARP entry for that port in the corresponding router namespace.  This completes the DVR-side handling of the new tenant VM port addition.
 +
  
 
The new tenant VM port is detected by the L2 Agent.  The L2 Agent identifies if this port is a member of subnet that is already distributed router interface.  If not, it does normal processing.  If yes, it does special processing wherein it adds this port (OFPORT) to existing OVS Rules in br-int and br-tun for the matching subnet gateway.  
 
The new tenant VM port is detected by the L2 Agent.  The L2 Agent identifies if this port is a member of subnet that is already distributed router interface.  If not, it does normal processing.  If yes, it does special processing wherein it adds this port (OFPORT) to existing OVS Rules in br-int and br-tun for the matching subnet gateway.  
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==== Existing VM is removed from a distributed router subnet interface ====
 
==== Existing VM is removed from a distributed router subnet interface ====
 +
  
 
When a tenant VM is removed from a subnet interface managed by the distributed router, a DeletePort API invocation is done by Nova for the deleted tenant VM.  As part of deletePort servicing by the ML2 Plugin, the ML2 plugin will inform the L3 Plugin about a port being deleted.  The L3 Plugin will check if this deleted port is in a DVR hosted subnet. If not it will not do any processing.  If yes, the L3 Plugin will initiate an RPC call port_delete() to the L3-Agent-on-CN.  The L3-Agent-on-CN will service this RPC in which it will get this port information and remove matching static ARP entry for that port in the corresponding router namespace.  This completes the DVR-side handling of the tenant VM port removal.
 
When a tenant VM is removed from a subnet interface managed by the distributed router, a DeletePort API invocation is done by Nova for the deleted tenant VM.  As part of deletePort servicing by the ML2 Plugin, the ML2 plugin will inform the L3 Plugin about a port being deleted.  The L3 Plugin will check if this deleted port is in a DVR hosted subnet. If not it will not do any processing.  If yes, the L3 Plugin will initiate an RPC call port_delete() to the L3-Agent-on-CN.  The L3-Agent-on-CN will service this RPC in which it will get this port information and remove matching static ARP entry for that port in the corresponding router namespace.  This completes the DVR-side handling of the tenant VM port removal.
 +
  
 
The removed port is detected by the L2 Agent.  The L2 Agent identifies if this port is a member of subnet that is already distributed router interface.  If not, it does normal processing.  If yes, it does special processing wherein it modifies the existing OVS rules in br-int and br-tun so that the rule does not contain this port being deleted (OFPORT).  
 
The removed port is detected by the L2 Agent.  The L2 Agent identifies if this port is a member of subnet that is already distributed router interface.  If not, it does normal processing.  If yes, it does special processing wherein it modifies the existing OVS rules in br-int and br-tun so that the rule does not contain this port being deleted (OFPORT).  

Latest revision as of 07:10, 5 April 2014

Authors

Vivekanandan Narasimhan     Hewlett Packard Inc
Swaminathan Vasudevan     Hewlett Packard Inc

Purpose

NOTE: This Blueprint is part of the Distributed Virtual Router. The parent blueprint for the DVR can be accessed from the link below.


Distributed Virtual Router Blueprint


This document describes the changes that are proposed in the L2 Plugin and the L2 Agent for OpenStack Neutron in order to enable distributed virtual router functionality at the L2 layer.


Design Goals for L2 in DVR

There are set of goals that went into the design of the set of rules in OVS to enable distributed virtual routing functionality at the L2 layer. They are the following:

1. The rules should enable communication between tenant VMs on different networks, via a distributed router hosted in the compute node.

2. Any given distributed router instance may reside on an all the Compute Nodes and will be responsible for routing packets generated by VMs co-residing on the same node.

3. A given distributed router instance is either hosted in the Compute Node as DVR (or) as normal router on the Network Node, but never simultaneously in both the nodes.

4. The rules should be such that the existing OpenVswitch infrastructure in OpenStack Neutron can be used to accomplish distributed routing.

5. Should use lesser MAC Address per compute node and continue to preserve L2 isolation for routed packets by distributed routers.

6. Should ensure enablement of North-South routing, which indicates access to external network by the VMs directly.

7. Should embrace FWaaS Service to be operational even with distributed routing enabled on DVR interfaces.

8. MAC timeouts and ARP timeouts of any element (bridges) inside the nodes in the cloud, should not affect operation of DVR

9. The rules must ensure that multi-tenant isolation is intact even when Overlapping IP Addresses is enabled in the cloud.

10. The rules must ensure that multi-tenant isolation is intact even when Overlapping MAC Addresses are enabled in the cloud (By overlapping MAC Addresses, what is meant here is that MAC Addresses across different networks could be the same)


How Distributed Routing Works

In order to accomplish distributed routing, both the L3 and L2 Agent work will need to work hand-in-hand inside the Compute Node. Today the L3 Agent runs in Network Node, but with this DVR proposal, the L3 Agent will run in Compute Nodes as well. The L2 Agent on compute nodes will continue as is today but will work in an enhanced mode called the ‘DVR Mode’ where the L2 Agents will be additionally responsible for managing (adding/removing) OVS rules in order to accomplish distributed routing.

The following is a sample topology used to illustrate how distributed routing is accomplished.


DVR Packet Flow with details



Terminology for the contents of packets shown in the above figure:

red1-L-vlan Represents the local vlan of the red network on Compute node CN1


grn1-L-vlan Represents the local vlan of the green network on Compute node CN1


red2-L-vlan Represents the local vlan of the red network on Compute node CN2


grn2-L-vlan Represents the local vlan of the green network on Compute node CN2


red-vni Represents the VXLAN ID used in the tunneled frame, for the tenant network represented by red-L-vlan local vlan.


grn-vni Represents the VXLAN ID used in the tunneled frame, for the tenant network represented by grn-L-vlan local vlan.


r1-red-ip Represents the IP Address of the red subnet interface of the DVR Router (r1). This IP Address for red subnet interface would remain the same on DVR Router (r1) instantiated in both CN1 and CN2.


r1-grn-ip Represents the IP Address of the green subnet interface of the DVR Router (r1). This IP Address for green subnet interface would remain the same on DVR Router (r1) instantiated in both CN1 and CN2.


r1-red-mac Represents the MAC Address of the red subnet interface of the DVR Router (r1). This MAC Address for the red subnet interface would remain the same on DVR Router (r1) instantiated in both CN1 and CN2.


r1-grn-mac Represents the MAC Address of the green subnet interface of the DVR Router (r1). This MAC Address for the green subnet interface would remain the same on DVR Router (r1) instantiated in both CN1 and CN2.


dvr-cn1-mac Represents Mac Address allocated from DVR Base Mac pool by the controller to Compute Node CN1. This mac address will go as the source mac address in all the frames that are generated by the DVR subnet interfaces present in CN1.


dvr-cn2-mac Represents Mac Address allocated from DVR Base Mac pool by the controller to Compute Node CN2. This mac address will go as the source mac address in all the frames that are generated by the DVR subnet interfaces present in CN2.


In the above figure, a PING ECHO Request is initiated from vm1 on red network to vm2 on green network which are connected by a DVR router identified by r1. The DVR Router r1 will have the same IP Address and MAC Address on both the nodes CN1 and CN2. As we see, the DVR Router r1 has two interfaces: one interface is a subnet in the red network and another interface is a subnet in the green network.


The packet flow for PING ECHO Request from vm1 to vm2 is shown in the above figure with packets numbered from ‘1’ to ‘6’.


1 The frame with destination ip as ‘vm2 ip’ is sent by vm1 towards its default gateway mac for red network which is r1-red-mac. The integration bridge forwards this frame to DVR router r1.


2 The DVR router r1’s red subnet interface picks this frame and it then routes the IP packet in the frame.


3 After routing, the DVR router r1 puts the routed frame out of its green subnet interface. This frame is switched by the integration bridge towards the tunnel bridge along with tagging the frame with green network’s local-vlan tag.


4 The tunnel bridge on CN1, replaces the frame’s source mac address with a Unique DVR MAC Address of its node (one unique dvr mac address is assigned per compute node by the controller). The resulting frame is forwarded to CN2 by this tunnel bridge. Before forwarding, it also strips the local green-vlan tag and tunnels the frame with green-vni VXLAN id.


5 The tunnel bridge on CN2, picks up the tunneled frame, de-tunnels it and strips off the green-vni tag. It then adds its local green network vlan tag to the frame and forwards the frame to the integration bridge.


6 The integration bridge on CN2, identifies the incoming frame’s source mac address is a DVR Unique MAC Address (every compute node l2-agent knows all dvr unique mac addresses used in the cloud). It then replaces the DVR Unique MAC Address with the green subnet interface MAC address and forwards the frame to vm2.


For the PING RESPONSE from vm2 to vm1, the same above sequence happens in reverse.


As you might notice, the frames are routed by the DVR router in the frame originating node itself and then they are just put towards the right destination. For all the routed frames, the DVR Unique MAC Address of the frame’s originating node is used in the underlay, as the Source MAC Address of the frame (ie., in inner frame).


The ARP entry for vm2 will be pre-populated in DVR router r1 residing in CN1, by the L3-Agent running on CN1 (through information supplied from the L3 Plugin). Similarly the ARP entry for vm1 will be pre-populated in the DVR router r1 residing in CN2, again by the L3-Agent running on CN2 (through information supplied from the L3 Plugin).


On Compute Node CN1

Integration Bridge Rules

Integration Bridge Rules on Compute Node1


Tunnel Bridge Rules

Tunnel bridge Rules on Compute Node 1


On Compute Node CN2

Integration Bridge Rules

Integration Bridge Rules on CN2


Tunnel Bridge Rules

Tunnel Bridge Rules on Compute Node 2


All those tables and rules shown in brown are the new ones that will be additionally managed by the L2 Agent, while it runs in DVR Mode.


A brief description of the rules are given below:


a. ARP broadcast requests generated by tenant VMs are broadcasted to every other CN in the cloud. However, if the ARP request frame’s target is the default gateway IP (router subnet ip), then such frames are dropped by the local tunnel bridge from being forwarded to the cloud. Because, such ARPs need and will be serviced only by locally available DVR instances.


Tunnel bridge

DVR PROCESS Table 1 (New table for dvr): table=1, priority=4, dl_vlan= red1-L-vlan, dl_type=arp, ar_tpa= r1-red-ip actions: drop table=1, priority=4, dl_vlan= grn1-L-vlan, dl_type=arp, ar_tpa= r1-grn-ip actions: drop


b. All requests generated by the distributed router interface ports, be it ARP request, other broadcast (or) unicast packets, will be sent to the cloud. But, all such frames are considered “dvr routed frames” and hence such frames will carry “local unique dvr macaddress“ in the source mac of the frame before being forwarded to the cloud, on the originating node itself.


This translation of local router interface mac-address to “local unique dvr macaddress” is done by the following rules in the DVR PROCESS table.


Tunnel bridge

DVR PROCESS Table 1 (New table for dvr): table=1, priority=1, dl_vlan=red2_L_vlan, dl_src=r1-red-mac, actions: mod_dl_src=dvr-cn1-mac, resubmit(,2) table=1, priority=1, dl_vlan=grn2_L_vlan, dl_src=r1-grn-mac, actions: mod_dl_src=dvr-cn1-mac, resubmit (,2)


c. Complementing to what was captured as point b above, in DVR routed frames received by a compute node, the integration bridge on destination node will rip off the unique DVR MAC Addresses from the source MAC field of the frame. In place of the same, the integration bridge will substitute the local dvr instance subnet interface mac address , before the frame is forwarded to the local destination VM. This is done by new Table 1 on integration bridge. For example on CN2:


Integration Bridge Rules

Table 0: (Local switching table) table=0, priority=2, in_port=patch-tun, dl_src=dvr-cn1-mac actions: goto table 1 table=0, priority=1, actions: output->NORMAL Table 1: (DVR_TO_LOCALMAC table)


table=1, priority=2, dl_vlan=grn2-L-vlan, nw_dst=grn-subnet actions: strip_vlan, mod_dl_src=r1-grn-MAC,output->port-vm2 table=1, priority=1 actions: drop


d. Packets destined to the local dvr subnet interface mac address are dropped by the tunnel bridge in the originating compute node, as forwarding them to the cloud, will create mac ambiguity when the packet is decoded by other compute nodes in the cloud. This is accomplished by the following rules:


Tunnel bridge

DVR PROCESS Table 1 (New table for dvr): table=1, priority=2, dl_vlan=red2_L_vlan, dl_dst=r1-red-mac, actions: drop table=1, priority=2 , dl_vlan=grn2_L_vlan, dl_dst=r1-grn-mac, actions: drop


e. In order to prevent multiple unicast of routed packets destined to remote VMs to all compute nodes in the cloud, the l2 pre-population technique is used to pre-populate the FDB table in the compute node to put out the frame only to the correct single destination compute node.


f. For rules like these in the integration bridge, where a long list of ports might appear in the ‘output port’ action, this document proposes the use of ‘Group Tables’ facility available from OpenVswitch(OVS) version 2.1.


Integration bridge

Table 1: (DVR_TO_LOCALMAC table) table=1, priority=2, dl_vlan=grn2-L-vlan, nw_dst=grn-subnet actions: strip_vlan, mod_dl_src=r1-grn-MAC,output->port-vm2


DataModel Extension for L2 in DVR

Datamodel extension for L2 agent to handle Internal local MAC


The DistributedVirtualRouterMacAddress table is maintained in the controller and this table is used to store/retrieve unique DVR MAC Addresses supplied to L2 agent running on hosts identified by ‘host’.


Configuration specific to L2 Agent

enable_distributed_routing

The ovs_neutron_plugin.ini file being used by the OVS L2 Agent, will have an additional configuration flag:


enable_distributed_routing=False


In order to run the OVS L2 Agent in DVR Mode, the above flag must be set to True and the OVS L2 Agent must be restarted. The default value of this flag is False. For example on the Network Node, the L2 Agent will not run in DVR Mode. That is in NN, this flag will need to be left as is by the cloud administrator.


The L2 Agent will operate normally as it is today. However, when the enable_distributed_routing=True is read by the L2 Agent in its init(), it will additionally run in DVR Mode. What is DVR Mode? DVR Mode just refers to the enhanced behavior of the L2 Agent, wherein it will intelligently handle Distributed Router Interface ports that are detected on the integration bridge. As part of processing distributed router interface port (presence/absence), it will be using the OVS Rules documented in this document.


dvr_base_mac

There is another flag that will need to be made available in neutron.conf which represents the base-mac to use for DVR Unique MAC allocation by the ML2 Plugin. That configuration is given here:


  1. DVR Base MAC address. The first 3 octets will remain unchanged. If the
  2. 4th octet is not 00, it will also used. The others will be randomly generated.
  3. 3 octet
  4. dvr_base_mac = fa:16:3f:00:00:00
  5. 4 octet
  6. dvr_base_mac = fa:16:3f:4f:00:00


The above dvr_base_mac MUST be different from the base-mac used allocated for virtual ports. This is required in order to ensure isolation of virtual port Mac Addresses from the DVR Unique Mac Addresses themselves.


RPC Changes

This section describes the new RPC calls that will be introduced in the L2 area of OpenStack to enable DVR functionality.


The following new RPCs will be introduced:

get_dvr_mac_address_by_host (hostname)

Function that returns the DVR MAC address by host


get_dvr_mac_address()

Get DVR MAC address


dvr_mac_address_update()

DVR MAC Address update


get_compute_ports_on_host_by_subnet()

Get compute vm ports on host by subnet


get_compute_ports_by_subnet()

Get compute ports by subnet


get_device_details (device, agent_id)

Get device details


L2 Interaction with Plugin and L3 Agent

L2 OVS Agent initialization

During initialization the L2 OVS Agent needs to know its hosted unique dvr mac address, in order to key in the appropriate OVS rules into the tunnel and integration bridges. For this purpose, the L2 agent invokes RPC get_dvr_mac_address(host_id) served by ML2 plugin.


L2 OVS agent initialization


Distributed Router creation

A router can be created to explicitly as a distributed router. There is typically no action required on the agents due to creation of router (be in distributed mode or otherwise). Only when an interface is added to the router, there are actions taken in both the L2 and L3 agents. On the plugin side, as usual the created router information is stored in the DB which is shown in the figure below.


Router Add


Interface addition to a distributed router

A router-interface-add command executed on a distributed router results in routers_updated() RPC to be invoked on the L3-Agent-on-CN. As part of servicing such a request, the L3-Agent-on-CN initially validates if the router affected is a distributed router. If so, it then gets the interface port corresponding to that newly added interface and attaches that port on the integration bridge. This part of operation is similar in nature to that of the L3 Agent except for the difference being that the L3-Agent-on-CN runs in the Compute Node and adds router ports only if such ports are destined on a distributed router.


Ports that are interfaces of a distributed router will have a special device_owner field value as network:router_interface_distributed.


After adding the router interface port on the br-int, the L3-Agent-on-CN requests information about the list of ports on the cloud available on this subnet interface. For this it invokes get_compute_ports_ by_subnet (subnet_id) towards the L3 Plugin. The L3 Plugin then contacts the ML2 Plugin to get all the ports available on the input subnet and returns the list of ports to the L3-Agent-on-CN. The L3-Agent-on-CN caches these ports and then uses the port information to create static ARP entries in the DVR router namespace. This completes the DVR-side handling of the router-interface.


The router interface port added by the L3-Agent-on-CN is detected by the L2 Agent. The L2 Agent identifies if this port is a distributed router interface. If not, it does normal processing. If yes, it does special processing wherein it invokes get_compute_ports_on_host_by_subnet(subnet_id) to get the list of local VMs available on this router interface. It then uses this list of ports and the router interface port information to create OVS rules in the tunnel and the integration bridges.


Router Add Interface Flow


Interface removal from a distributed router

A router-interface-delete command executed on a distributed router results in routers_updated() RPC to be invoked on the L3-Agent-on-CN. As part of servicing such a request, the L3-Agent-on-CN initially validates if the router affected is a distributed router. If so, it then gets the interface port corresponding to that being deleted. It removes that router interface port on the integration bridge. This part of operation is similar in nature to that of the L3 Agent except for the difference being that the L3-Agent-on-CN runs in the Compute Node and deletes router ports only if such ports belong to a distributed router. After deleting the router interface port on the br-int, the L3-Agent-on-CN hits the port cache to ascertain the list of ports available on the deleted router interface. It then removes the static ARP entries from the router namespace for all the ports in that list. This completes the DVR-side handling of the router-interface deletion.


Router Interface Delete Flow


The router interface port deleted by the L3-Agent-on-CN is detected by the L2 Agent. The L2 Agent identifies if this port is a distributed router interface. If not, it does normal processing. If yes, it does special processing wherein it removes all the OVS rules from the integration and the tunnel bridges, matching the removed router interface port.


New VM added to a subnet interface of a distributed router

When a new tenant VM is added to a subnet interface managed by the distributed router, a CreatePort API invocation is done by Nova to host the new tenant VM. As part of createPort servicing by the ML2 Plugin, the ML2 plugin will inform the L3 Plugin about a new port being available. The L3 Plugin will check if this new port is in a DVR hosted subnet. If not it will not do any processing. If yes, the L3 Plugin will initiate an RPC call port_add() to the L3-Agent-on-CN. The L3-Agent-on-CN will service this RPC in which it will get this port information and add static ARP entry for that port in the corresponding router namespace. This completes the DVR-side handling of the new tenant VM port addition.


The new tenant VM port is detected by the L2 Agent. The L2 Agent identifies if this port is a member of subnet that is already distributed router interface. If not, it does normal processing. If yes, it does special processing wherein it adds this port (OFPORT) to existing OVS Rules in br-int and br-tun for the matching subnet gateway.


VM Port Create Flow


Existing VM is removed from a distributed router subnet interface

When a tenant VM is removed from a subnet interface managed by the distributed router, a DeletePort API invocation is done by Nova for the deleted tenant VM. As part of deletePort servicing by the ML2 Plugin, the ML2 plugin will inform the L3 Plugin about a port being deleted. The L3 Plugin will check if this deleted port is in a DVR hosted subnet. If not it will not do any processing. If yes, the L3 Plugin will initiate an RPC call port_delete() to the L3-Agent-on-CN. The L3-Agent-on-CN will service this RPC in which it will get this port information and remove matching static ARP entry for that port in the corresponding router namespace. This completes the DVR-side handling of the tenant VM port removal.


The removed port is detected by the L2 Agent. The L2 Agent identifies if this port is a member of subnet that is already distributed router interface. If not, it does normal processing. If yes, it does special processing wherein it modifies the existing OVS rules in br-int and br-tun so that the rule does not contain this port being deleted (OFPORT).


VM Port Delete Flow